Say "No to Antibiotics" - Grace Ngo Foundation

Health, Knowledge, Natural Food Matters

Saturday, 14 March 2020

Say "No to Antibiotics"

Introduction: Welcome to our special session on "Say No to antibiotics". As indicated by the topic is more of a hyperbole, it is not to say that when it is the only hope of saving a life, we should still "Say No" Bacteria vs Humans, The fact remains that before we humans existed on the planet earth, study says that bacterias, virus etc had been on earth for more than 4 million years. What this means therefore is that, bacterias are actually older than humans. No wonder, their smartness and the way they are actually outsmarting scientists and all their drugs and inventions to destroy these bugs We shall study the subject matter under the outline. Outine 1. Introduction 2. What is antibiotics 3. Why Antibiotics? 4. Origin of Antibiotics 5. Our Gut, the Battlefield 6. What is Infection? 7. Types of infection 8. Examples of Bacterial and Viral infections 9. When should I take antibiotics 10. Facts you should know about antibiotics 11. Basic Truth about antibiotics 12. General advice when Taking antibiotics 13. Some Side effects of antibiotics 14. Antibiotics Resistance 15. How to prevent antibiotics Resistance 16. What is Symbiosis and Dysbiosis? 17. What is Gut Dysbiosis 18. Signs and symptoms of Gut Dysbiosis 19. Various conditions that have been linked to gut dysbiosis 20. What to do in case it's Gut Dysbiosis 21. What is probiotics 22.Most potent Natural Antibiotics 23. Essential oils with antibacterial properties 24. Some secret that has helped avoid taking antibiotics over the years 25. Summary 26. Questions So sad that most of us are still living on regular antibiotics, may be simply because, they seem to be fast acting. The first point to be established is that before antibiotics invention, our ancestors lived and did so, to a full riped old age. Where there no bacterias, virus and microbes then? Certainly yes. 1. What is antibiotics? According to Wikipedia.org "An antibiotic is a type of antimicrobial substance active against bacteria and is the most important type of antibacterial agent for fighting bacterial infections. Antibiotic medications are widely used in the treatment of infections. They may either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria" 2. Why Antibiotics Antibiotics are generally administered to kill specific microorganisms; however, since most antibiotics have a wide range of effects, they also affect related microorganisms. These effects are imprinted in the intestinal environment for several months even after discontinuation of the dosing. 3. Origin of Antibiotics Before the discovery or the advent of antibiotics, bacteria, virus and other microbes have existed side by side with humans, in an environment termed a symbiotic relationship, everyone knows his boundary and during boots of infection, natural remedies were used to repress the other and allow the immune system do its job. Everyone was happy and life expectancy was higher too. According to research, it was not until 1928 that penicillin, the first true antibiotic, was discovered by Alexander Fleming, Professor of Bacteriology at St. ... Fleming found that his "mold juice" was capable of killing a wide range of harmful bacteria, such as streptococcus, meningococcus and the diphtheria bacillus. Since then, it has been from one antibiotics invention to the other. The glaring truth fans, is They are older and appears smarter. In recent times, a full blown war against bacteria, viruses and germs had been declared with varying antibiotic discoveries flooding the market each year, funny enough, bacterias are resisting most of these antibiotics and we are almost defeated. However, there seem to be light at the end of the tunnel, if we can humbly accept their existence and use natural antibiotics which mother nature has provided instead 4 *Our Gut - The Battlefield The particular interrelationship between the intestinal microbiota and the host is a product of long-term coexistence and evolution. Dysbiosis, a disruption of microbial composition by various stresses, has been implicated in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), colon cancer, obesity, asthma, and other diseases. The first step in treatment of diseases with antibiotics is to understand the symbiotic relationship between the intestinal microbiota and its host. We shall explore more on dysbiosis, it's causes, symptoms, and remedies as we proceed in this seminar. 5. What is Infection Infection occurs when viruses, bacteria, or other microbes enter your body and begin to multiply. Disease occurs when the cells in your body are damaged as a result of infection and signs and symptoms of an illness appear. The incidence of disease among those infected varies greatly depending on the particular pathogen and individual susceptibility. In response to infection, your immune system springs into action. White blood cells, antibodies, and other mechanisms go to work to rid your body of the foreign invader. Indeed, many of the symptoms that make a person suffer during an infection—fever, malaise, headache, rash—result from the activities of the immune system trying to eliminate the infection from the body. Where, the immune system is not strong enough for various reasons to destroy or overcome the bacteria infection, a particular antibiotic to destroy them are introduced either as tablets, capsules, or injections. 6. Types of Infection For the purpose of this discussion, we identify two main types of Infection. Bacterial and Viral infections. Whereas bacteria infection may in severe cases require an antibiotics, viral infections must run their course and are best helped with antiviral drugs. 7. When Should I Take Antibiotics Stick to using antibiotics only when necessary—that is, to treat serious, confirmed bacterial infections and certain life-threatening diseases After a confirmatory test and the extent the bacteria infection has advanced and life threathening Also, it must be prescribed by a competent physician Having said that, life threatening situations rarely occur if we always include mother nature antibiotics in our regular diet. 8. Some examples of Bacteria and Viral infections If ever you must take antibiotics, let it be for bacteria and not viral infection. Both of them are not the same, but most times ignorance leads us to take antibiotics indiscriminately as a quick fix against viral infections. Some examples of bacterial infections include: strep throat urinary tract infection (UTI) bacterial food poisoning gonorrhea tuberculosis bacterial meningitis cellulitis Lyme disease Some examples of viral infections include: influenza common cold viral gastroenteritis chickenpox measles viral meningitis warts human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral hepatitis Zika virus9. Facts You Must Know about Antibiotics If you and your doctor believe you must be on antibiotics at any time, have these facts at the back of your mind: 1. Antibiotics can kill the good bacteria in your tummy. 2. Even if you feel better, continue the course of antibiotics to the very end. The length of the course is determined by your doctor to ensure that the infection is entirely beaten. If you do not complete the course, you run the risk of the bacteria multiplying again - this time, immune to the antibiotic it has been exposed to 3. Make sure you understand and comply with the dosage and storage requirements. Some antibiotics should be taken before meals, some after. Some need to be stored at room temperature, others should be kept in the fridge. Some are rendered ineffective if you drink alcohol. Follow the instructions carefully to ensure that you are quickly restored to good health. 4. Due to the damage usually done to the gut, it is advised after a course of antibiotics to follow up with probiotics, like yoghurt, fermented millet and other fermented foods to help repopulated the good bacteria, which was depleted after the antibiotics treatment. 5. It is also important to take more water to help clean the internal organs. West Nile virus 9. Facts You Must Know about Antibiotics If you and your doctor believe you must be on antibiotics at any time, have these facts at the back of your mind: 1. Antibiotics can kill the good bacteria in your tummy. 2. Even if you feel better, continue the course of antibiotics to the very end. The length of the course is determined by your doctor to ensure that the infection is entirely beaten. If you do not complete the course, you run the risk of the bacteria multiplying again - this time, immune to the antibiotic it has been exposed to 3. Make sure you understand and comply with the dosage and storage requirements. Some antibiotics should be taken before meals, some after. Some need to be stored at room temperature, others should be kept in the fridge. Some are rendered ineffective if you drink alcohol. Follow the instructions carefully to ensure that you are quickly restored to good health. 4. Due to the damage usually done to the gut, it is advised after a course of antibiotics to follow up with probiotics, like yoghurt, fermented millet and other fermented foods to help repopulated the good bacteria, which was depleted after the antibiotics treatment. 5. It is also important to take more water to help clean the internal organs. 10. Basic Truth About antibiotics Antibiotics discovery is a great breakthrough invention, however, a lack of understanding on behalf of the public puts individuals and society as a whole at risk on the right and proper way to use antibiotics when ever necessary. For the individuals who are unnecessarily exposed to antibiotics. They risk so many things The most common risk of undue exposure to antibiotics are: a. Resistance by Bacteria b. Colonization of these bugs c. Destruction of gut health. Kills the bad and the good bacteria, leading to poor digestion, constipation and other metabolic problems. d. Other health problems after antibiotics usage 11. General advice when Taking antibiotics If you and your doctor believe you must be on antibiotics, take these steps to ensure their effectiveness and your recovery: Take probiotics. Antibiotics can kill the good bacteria in your tummy, so Dr Brink also advises taking a probiotic to replace these while taking an antibiotic. Even better, he recommends eating lots of yoghurt (best is unsweetened,) unflavoured yoghurt) to restore balance to your gut flora. Yoghurt is better, explains Dr Brink, because researchers have not yet identified the full range of probiotic cultures that should appear in a course of probiotics. Complete the course of antibiotics. Even if you feel better, continue the course of antibiotics to the very end. The length of the course is determined by your doctor to ensure that the infection is entirely beaten. If you do not complete the course, you run the risk of the bacteria multiplying again - this time, immune to the antibiotic it has been exposed to. Make sure you understand and comply with the dosage and storage requirements. Some antibiotics should be taken before meals, some after. Some need to be stored at room temperature, others should be kept in the fridge. Some are rendered ineffective if you drink alcohol. Continued on in part 2 Follow the instructions carefully to ensure that you are quickly restored to good health.

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